Overview

Final energy consumption has grown up by 0.5%/year from 2000 to 2007 and decreased by 0.7%/year afterwards. In 2015 the final energy consumption (normal climate) was close to 25.4 Mtoe. Industry and residential are the largest consuming sector with 28.3% of the final consumption in 2015. Industry recorded 11 pc point decrease since 2000. The transport sector represents 26% of final consumption (+9 pc points compared to 2000). The service sector accounted for 12.6% (-2 pc points compared to 2000).

Figure 1: Final energy consumption by sector (normal climate)

Source: ODYSSEE

Energy efficiency for final consumers, as measured by ODEX improved by an average of 1.2%/year from 2000 to 2015 (or 25%). Largest gains were obtained in the industry sector (1.8%/year), following by residential (1.3%/year) and services (1.1%/year). No real progress can be observed in the transport sector.

Figure 2: Technical Energy Efficiency Index

Source: ODYSSEE

The Czech Republic sets the 2020 final energy saving target of 51.1 PJ in the National Energy efficiency Action Plan (NAPEE). The Czech Republic has decided to reach the target by alternative measures. Two measures are the most important - New Green Savings Programme 2014-2020 with expected energy savings of 11 PJ in the period 2017-2020 focuses on energy savings in buildings and Operational Programme Enterprise and Innovation for Competitiveness in industry sector with expected energy savings of 9.6 PJ in the period 2017-2020. Typical cross-cutting measure represents State Programme in Support of Energy Savings.

Table 1: Sample of cross-cutting measures

MeasuresNEEAP measuresDescriptionExpected savings, impact evaluationMore information available
State Programme in Support of Energy SavingsyesState Programme in Support of Energy Savings contributes to national energy savings target according to Article 7 of the energy efficiency directive 2012/27/EU. The main support is concentrated on actions with indirect effects on energy saving, such as public awareness, education expert and free advice. 0.4 PJ in the period 20017-2020Link
Source: MURE

Buildings

In 2015, space heatinging accounted for 70% of sector's consumption, water heating for 17%, cooking for 6% and electrical appliances for 7%. Space heating consumption decreased by 0.3%/year since 2000. Electrical appliances increased by almost 1.8%/year and water heating increased by 1.7%/year. Residential energy consumption increased by 0.2%/year since 2000.

Figure 3: Energy consumption of space heating per m2

Source: ODYSSEE

Figure 4: Energy consumption by end-use per dwelling

Source: ODYSSEE

Final energy consumption per dwelling was only slightly higer in 2015 than in 2000. Three main factors contributed to increase energy consumption overt the period - more dweelings (0.9 Mtoe), larger homes (0.77 Mtoe) and more appliances (0.25 Mtoe). Energy savings balanced the effect of increased energy consumption due to the three main factors.

Figure 5: Main drivers of the energy consumption variation in households

Source: ODYSSEE

The energy consumption per employee in service sector is steadily decreasing by 1.1%/year since 2000. However electricity consumption, due to electrical appliances in office, is increasing by 0.8%/year over the same period.

Figure 6: Energy and electricity consumption per employee (normal climate)

Source: ODYSSEE

The main measure for the building sector is the New Green Savings Programme 2014-2020 which focuses on single-family buildings and housing buildings. Operational Programme Enterprise and Innovation for Competitiveness aims for improving the energy performance of buildings in the business sector.

Table 2: Sample of policies and measures implemented in the building sector

MeasuresDescriptionExpected savings, impact evaluationMore information available
New Green Savings Programme 2014-2020New Green Savings Programme 2014–2020 administrated by the State Environmental Fund, focuses on energy savings and the efficient use of the energy sources in structures. This programme is running between 2014 and 2020, and has been prepared for the owners and investors behind single-family buildings and housing buildings.3.387 PJ in 2014–2016 and 11.037 PJ in 2016–2020Link
Operational Programme Enterprise and Innovation for CompetitivenessThis Programme focuses on the shift to energy efficient, low carbon economy consisting primarily in increasing the energy efficiency in industry and using renewable energy sources8.5 PJ in 2014–2016 and 11.4 PJ in 2016–2020Link
Source: MURE

Transport

Cars account for 54% of the sector’s consumption and road freight transport for 28%. Bus transport represents 10% and air transport 5%. The rest represents rail (3%) and water transport (<0.1%).

Figure 7: Split of the transport energy consumption by mode

Source: ODYSSEE

The traffic of passengers (measured in passenger-kilometers) is increasing since 2000 (by 0.6%/year). This increase was mainly observed in car transport (0.6%/year), public transport (1.6%/year) and rail transport (0.9%/year).

Figure 8: Share of transport in passenger traffic

Source: ODYSSEE

Traffic of goods (measured in tonne-kilometers) has been also increasing by 1.8%/year, with a significant increase in road transport of goods (2.8%/year), which led to a higher share of road transport in the total traffic of goods because rail transport decreased by (-0.9%/year). Water transport has been decreasing rapidly by -5.7%/year.

Figure 9: Share of modes in freight traffic

Source: ODYSSEE

Transport energy consumption has been increasing rapidly by 2.7%/year. This trend is caused by activity (almost +1 Mtoe) (more passenger-kilometers and tonne-kilometers) and by other effects (almost +1.2 Mtoe). Energy savings balanced the effect of modal shift (0.09 Mtoe).

Figure 10: Main drivers of the energy consumption variation in transport (2000-2014)

Source: ODYSSEE

Low energy savings in transport sectors are mainly caused by slow implementation of Operational programme transport, which focuses on modal shift measures. The main objective in freight transport is to switch from road transport to rail transport.

Table 3: Policies and measures into force in the transport sector

MeasuresDescriptionExpected savings, impact evaluationMore information available
Operational Programme TransportSupport of multimodal freight transport and modernisation of the railway and road network.LowLink
Combined transportMeasures supporting combined transportLowLink
Source: MURE

Industry

Final energy consumption of industry decreased rapidly by 2.0%/year. 67% of consumption remains concentrated in 5 energy intensive branches (steel, chemicals, non-metallic, paper and non-ferrous).

Figure 11: Final energy consumption by branch

Source: ODYSSEE

Among the 5 energy intensive branches, steel industry has the biggest share of industry final energy consumption (25.5% in 2015). However unit consumption in steel industry had an decreasing trend since 2012. Paper production has increasing unit energy consumption and the deterioration between 2000 and 2015 amounted 50%.

Figure 12: Unit consumption of energy‐intensive products (toe/t)

Source: ODYSSEE

Since 2000, many factors contributed to decrease in industrial energy consumption (-2.5 Mtoe). Energy savings (-4.07 Mtoe) almost compensated increase in energy consumption due to higher activity effect (4.9 Mtoe). Structural changes account for -3.2 Mtoe.

Figure 13: Main drivers of the energy consumption variation in industry

Source: ODYSSEE

The most important measure in industrial sector is Operational Programme Enterprise and Innovation for Competitiveness which through financial incentives (investment subsidies and low interest loans) supports energy efficiency measures. The previous Operational Programme Industry and Innovation finished in 2014.

Table 4: Policies and measures into force in industry

MeasuresDescriptionExpected savings, impact evaluationMore information available
Operational Programme Enterprise and Innovation for CompetitivenessIncreasing the energy efficiency in industry and using renewable energy sourcesHighLink
Operational Programme Industry and InnovationPromotion of energy efficiencyMediumLink
Source: MURE